South Sudanese student shot dead in Sudan

South Sudanese student shot dead in Sudan

A South Sudanese student has been reportedly killed in the ongoing political unrest in Sudan that led to the military takeover which removed Prime Abdalla Hamdok. 

Mahamed Salih Kur Lual Kur, 18, was hit by a stray bullet while on his way back home from the university on Monday, October 25, 2021, when the military took over power.

The uncle of the deceased Ngor Jok told Eye Radio that “Kur was shot in the head with a live bullet, at a bus station.”

Late Salih, a first-year student of electrical engineering at Imam Alhadi University in Khartoum, was among more than 10 people reportedly killed in the ongoing demonstration calling for the reversal to Sudan’s civilian rule.

The South Sudan government is yet to comment on the matter.

On Tuesday, the Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, Deng Dau Deng urged South Sudanese in Sudan to stay indoors to avoid being caught up in the melee of violence.

In 2019, four South Sudanese also died during the protest where Sudan’s longest-serving President Omar Hassan al-Bashir was ousted.

According to the UN agency, there were more than four million South Sudanese who fled the country’s protracted conflict to Sudan.

“For sustainable peace to be achieved, you as parliamentarians must use your oversight function over the line ministries to design programs that will support the return of the displaced persons to their respective areas.

In September, President Salva Kiir called on the Members of Parliament to ensure service delivery to people so that the displaced persons can return home.

“For sustainable peace to be achieved,’’ said President Kiir, adding: “you as parliamentarians must use your oversight function over the line ministries to design programs that will support the return of the displaced persons to their respective areas.”

Despite the signing of the September 2018 revitalised peace agreement, and its slow implementation, most of the critical provisions were yet to be fully implemented to enable the repatriation of millions of South Sudanese refugees in neighbouring countries.

The rampant sub-national conflicts have also hindered most of the refugees and internally displaced persons to return home to rebuild their livelihoods.

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